History

A short journey through history, events in and around the clothing trade from 1780 to 2005:

On 1 November 2005 the clothing and silk trading company I.W. Hvidberg, of 25 Løngangsstræde, Copenhagen, celebrated its 225th anniversary.

Today, the company is the only one of its kind in Denmark. Within the last 50 years, for many reasons, innumerable clothing companies have had to close down. Messrs I.W. Hvidberg also experienced hard times, but successfully reefed the sails in due course without significantly changing the old concept. Despite all odds the company is still in business today, now better known under the name of “Hvidberg Stoffer” (in English: Hvidberg Clothing) and doing business in accordance with today’s trends, but basically in accordance with the old concept, which places quality above all, in addition providing to a kind and personal customer service.

HISTORICAL REVIEW
In 1780 Copenhagen was a small city confined within the city walls. The absolute king was Christian VII, who at this time was a divorcee. In 1772 through a coup he had disowned his wife Caroline Mathilde; she had been deprived of her children and deported from Denmark. He had arranged for the execution of his court physician Struensee. Crown Prince Frederik (VI) was only 12 years old, and as his father was mentally ill, the country was governed by Ove Høegh-Guldberg, Privy Councillor, and the Dowager Queen, Juliane Marie. Only four years later the Crown Prince took power by a coup. In France Louis XIV and Marie Antoinette were still on their thrones. They received a visit from Benjamin Franklin, among others. In 1778 Benjamin Franklin succeeded in persuading France to acknowledge the independence of the United States and declare war on England. This contributed greatly to the beheading of the two French royals in 1793.
But in Denmark in 1780 life was generally peaceful, and our trade was flourishing. This must have been the reason why two tradesmen from Jutland each established their own hosier and silk trading company in Copenhagen.

But in Denmark in 1780 life was generally peaceful, and our trade was flourishing. This must have been the reason why two tradesmen from Jutland each established their own hosier and silk trading company in Copenhagen.

One was named Michael Pedersen, who in 1767, at the young age of 11, arrived in Copenhagen, and stayed with his uncle, Niels Andersen Sædding, a hosier. In 1779 Michael Pedersen obtained his own trade license as a hosier and silk merchant, now in the name of Michael Kierkegaard. He prospered so well that in 1797 he sold his business to a member of his family and lived off his fortune for the rest of his life. At the time he did not know that at the age of 56 in 1813 he would become the father of Søren Aabye Kierkegaard, the last in line of 7 children.

Henrik Hansen Lund, the other tradesman from Jutland, established his hosier and silk trading company in November 1780. In the course of a few years he had a flourishing business. He became the father of many children, one of whom being famous even today within nature research. His name was Peter W. Lund, naturalist and scientist, born in 1801. He travelled to Brazil twice...

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